Zarah Cinarli
I'm a Visual Designer who strives to tell stories through design
Branding: Hirrlinger's

What's in a Word?

This was a super fun branding project for one of our freelance copywriters that we worked with at the agency. The inspiration derived from newspaper design, since this is the most well known medium where words are the most powerful and immediate . The only question was, how do we up up the stakes?

Branding: Hirrlinger's

Branding: Hirrlinger's

It was very important to me to get a true understand where our client was coming from and to get a good understanding of his headspace. Meetings and talks that included many mood-boarding sessions helped zero in on creating a brand that expressed how passionate the written word was to him.

Translating Ideas

Translating Ideas

Having an understanding of where this brand should go I realized that the simplest answer was to base the brand on old-school news paper design, with a little kick to it.

 

How does that translate into actual design?

Keeping traditional newspaper grids while going completely of grid and creating a new way of organizing text when calling out important detail. A little visual kick that we included was our tomato red, which was used by early color newspapers to call out important elements throughout the paper.

Desktop_website_hirrlinger_01.jpg
Desktop_website_hirrlinger_02.jpg
Desktop_website_hirrlinger_03.jpg
Desktop_website_hirrlinger_04.jpg
Print Collateral

Print Collateral

How did we keep the idea of "Old-school but with a little kick" alive with the print experience?

Well there's a tiny bit of a history lesson involved: Traditional papers were created by the letterpress which gave letters a tiny bit of a raised impression (this should not be confused with embossing, it was plainly the ink that was raised) which allowed the reader to feel the letters. I turned that idea on its head, collaborated with a printer and we found this beautiful paper that had a woven/plastic feel to it and let the text be simply printed with no raised effect. This method still allowed the recipient to feel and connect with the printed collateral.  

Print_hirrlinger_01.jpg